Black Artists Built Country Music—And Then It Left Them Behind — TIME

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Reblogging this from TIME. Article by Andrew R. Chow. Enjoy! I’ll be back with you soon.

– Ty

Over the past few months, a contentious debate has raged over whether Lil Nas X, whose single “Old Town Road” spent a record 19 weeks atop the Billboard Hot 100 this summer, is a country artist. But for the filmmaker Ken Burns, the answer is clear. “The fact somebody has walked into country music, that…

via Black Artists Built Country Music—And Then It Left Them Behind — TIME

Teen-Beat – Dischord. Arlington, VA

This is so cool.

Hometown Sounds

This video [Teen-Beat catalog #535] is a little unusual, so let us explain. Record labels are the glue that binds musical creativity together into a product that can stand the test of time. The DC area in general, and Arlington in particular, greatly benefited from two independent labels that did amazing work documenting and organizing their scenes. Teen-Beat is a record label founded by Mark Robinson of the band Unrest in 1984. It has since moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts, but in its DC heyday featured indie rock bands such as Tuscadero, Phil Krauth and Jonny Cohen’s Love Machine. This video was shot and scored by Robinson at Dischord House, the Arlington home of Ian MacKaye and Jeff Nelson’s label documenting the punk, post-hardcore and rock output of DC for decades. It’s a brief and intense glimpse into the creative space that’s shaped our city’s musical legacy, and it moves…

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The Union of Socialist Geographers Newsletter, 1975-1983

I have a new post coming soon with information about the classes I’m teaching this upcoming semester. For now, this socialist geography time capsule (1975-1983) just came through the wire, and I figured I’d pass it along.

AntipodeFoundation.org

We’re pleased to announce that AntipodeFoundation.org is now the home of the archive of the Union of Socialist Geographers!

Thanks to the tireless work of Jim Thatcher (University of Washington Tacoma), Eric Sheppard (University of California Los Angeles), and Clark Akatiff (one-time Professor/life-long professor of geography), we’re able to make available the USG’s Newsletters, published from 1975 to 1982, as well as its final publication from 1983, “Society and Nature: Socialist Perspectives on the Relationship Between Human and Physical Geography”.

The archive will remain here for research, education and scholarship, freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs license. As you’ll see in their introduction here, Jim, Eric and Clark have reached out to a number of editors, authors and contributors, and they–and everyone here at Antipode–would like to sincerely thank all those who responded. If you have anything to add to the archive, or have any queries, please contact…

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Society for Conservation Biology Grants

After a rewarding and draining trip out to Southern California, I’m back in Knoxville and beginning the adventure of catching up. I have posts about the Emotional Geographies conference I attended in Long Beach as well as some urban investigations in LA in the works, and both should be up by later this week or next.

I write so little on this site about biology (especially conservation biology), that I figured the least I could do was give a slight signal boost to a great grant opportunity. It’s an area I know so little about, so rather than trying to publish uninformed opinions here, it would be more constructive just to pass this along. – Tyler


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This photo comes from the Orange County Society for Conservation, which may or may not be directly related to the Society for Conservation’s at large. I’m just putting it here because this owl is adorable.

The Society for Conservation Biology is pleased to solicit applications for the David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellowship Program. These two year postdoctoral fellowships provide support for outstanding early-career scientists of any nationality who want to better link conservation science and theory with policy and management, improving and expanding their research skills while directing their efforts towards conservation problems of pressing concern for the United States.

Each Fellow proposes a team of at least two mentors: 1. an academic mentor who encourages the Fellow’s continued development as a conservation scientist and 2. a conservation practitioner who connects the Fellow and her/his research to practical applications. Fellows may be administratively based at either an academic institution or conservation organization in the United States, typically the location of either the academic or practitioner mentor. We encourage applicants to explore both options and consider being based at the non-academic institution as that is the world less familiar to most early-career scientists and can provide valuable experience.

Fellows will spend up to three weeks per year during their fellowship attending Program-sponsored professional development retreats. These retreats provide opportunities to cultivate skills typically not covered during their academic education including: leadership, communications, professional and funder networks, and to gain better understanding of policy making and application of research.

The Smith Fellows Program and its administrative host, the Society for Conservation Biology, are committed to equity, inclusion and diversity and invites individuals who bring a diversity of culture, experience and ideas to apply. We envision that the cadre of scientists supported by the Smith Fellows Program will eventually assume leadership positions across the field of conservation science. Fellows are selected on the basis of innovation, potential for leadership and strength of proposal.

The deadline for receipt of application materials is 8 September 2017. The Program expects to select five Fellows in January 2018 for appointments to start between March and September 2018. Fellowship awards include an annual salary of $55,000, benefits, and generous travel and research budgets.

For detailed proposal guidelines, please visit the Smith Fellow websiteQuestions may be directed to Shonda Foster, Program Director, by emailing sfoster@conbio.orgPlease share within your professional networks!

Five Nifty (and Funded!) New Projects at West Virginia University Looking for Geographers

I just saw this posting come through a listserv and felt the need to pass it along here, for anyone who may be looking forward to a well-funded graduate program and may be interested in this surprisingly diverse set of research topics in West Virginia. Good luck! – Tyler


The Geography Program at West Virginia University is currently recruiting five funded graduate students for 2017-18 academic year.  WVU Geography offers both Masters and Doctoral degrees and a rigorous certificate program in Geographic Information Science.  Our rapidly growing graduate program is composed of 19 core geography faculty with expertise in the interdisciplinary subfields of Human Geography, Environmental Geography and GIScience (http://www.geography.wvu.edu/people).  WVU Geography faculty are engaged in local, regional and global research focused on human-environment relations, climate change, political geography, spatial science, digital humanities, forest ecosystem modeling, cultural and political ecologies, conservation science, feminist geography, science and technology studies, humanitarianism, land change science, critical cartographies, food justice, and development geography.  Faculty are currently conducting research in South Asia, Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, East Asia and the United States, including Appalachia.

The geography faculty are recruiting for 5 Graduate Research Assistant positons on funded projects.  Applicants interested in the Graduate Research Assistantships described below are encouraged to contact the research faculty prior to applying. Applicants must submit a CV and research statement addressing specific interests and qualifications for the potential research topics outlined below. In addition to the specific qualifications for these positions, potential candidates must meet the admission standards and be fully accepted into the Geology & Geography Department at WVU. Transcripts, test scores, and all other completed application materials are due January 1, 2017 for Fall 2017 admission. You can access the application portal here: https://graduateadmissions.wvu.edu/.

Funded projects include:

Human Dimensions of Water in Appalachia
This study will focus on the dual nature of water in West Virginia: a resource towards economic transition and/or a source of concern due to its polluted and destructive nature. This study will be based on a case study methodology where experience with qualitative methods is required and knowledge of GIS is welcomed.

Webpage: http://pages.geo.wvu.edu/~mcaretta/

Faculty Information:  Dr. Martina Angela Caretta, martina.caretta@mail.wvu.edu

Social Vulnerability and Adaptation to Climate Change in Botswana
This research project is based in the Okavango Delta, Botswana and focuses on understanding how existing social vulnerabilities related to gender and ethnicity result in differential adaptive capacities for people in changing environments. RA responsibilities will include assistance with research design, fieldwork in remote locations, and data analysis.

Webpage: http://pages.geo.wvu.edu/~jshinn/

Faculty Information: Dr. Jamie Shinn, jamie.shinn@mail.wvu.edu

Mapping Wildfire Burn Severity in the New Jersey Pinelands using WorldView-3 imagery, Mobile Terrestrial Lidar and Aerial Lidar
Mobile ground-based lidar and aerial lidar, in conjunction with WorldView-3 satellite imagery, offers new opportunities for mapping wildfire burn severity using remote sensing.  RA responsibilities will focus on ground and aerial lidar analysis; prior experience with working with lidar for vegetation analysis is preferred.

Webpage: http://pages.geo.wvu.edu/~warner/

Faculty Information: Dr. Tim Warner; Tim.Warner@mail.wvu.edu

Food Justice and Cooperative Development in Appalachia
This research fellowship is housed within the Food Justice Lab at WVU and focuses on food sovereignty and the potential of cooperative enterprises in advancing social and economic change in West Virginia and Appalachia more broadly. RA responsibilities will include research assistance on the WV FOODLINK community food security project (http://foodlink.wvu.edu) supported by USDA and regional foundation grants. GIS background is desired.  Fellows will join a dynamic community of graduate students in the Food Justice Lab who are advancing alternative economic futures.

Webpage:  http://foodjustice.wvu.edu

Faculty Information: Dr. Bradley Wilson, brwilson@mail.wvu.edu

Personal Virtual Reality (VR) System for Geovisualization
The goal of this project is developing framework and applications of personal VR system centered in geovisualization for spatial analysis, science communication, geography education, and many more areas of geography. RA will be required to have some experience of computer programming and GIS software.

Webpage: http://insuhong.wixsite.com/blog/

Faculty Information: Dr. Insu Hong, insu.hong@mail.wvu.edu

Funding Packages:
Doctoral Applicants: Funded Ph.D. students will be guaranteed 3 years of funding contingent upon progress within the program and are eligible for continued funding in years 4 and 5, based upon performance.

Master’s Applicants: Funded M.A. students are guaranteed 1 year of funding contingent upon progress within the program and are eligible for continued funding in year 2, based upon performance.

Program and University Information:
WVU recently attained R1 Carnegie Ranking and Geography is a respected Program of Excellence at the university.  We are located in Morgantown, a vibrant town repeatedly ranked as one of the best small cities in the country (http://www.morgantownwv.gov/about/awards) and located just 75 miles south of Pittsburgh.  The Geography Program is housed in a state of the art research facility and students have access to some of the best outdoor recreation opportunities in the East (https://diyoutdoors.wvu.edu/).

West Virginia University is an Equal Employment Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer dedicated to building a culturally diverse and pluralistic faculty, staff and students committed to working in a multicultural environment. The university welcomes applications from all qualified individuals, including minorities, females, individuals with disabilities, and veterans.

EDITORIAL: What I Said When My White Friend Asked for My Black Opinion on White Privilege

One of the most important challenges that cultural geographers have taken on has been to help people realize how privilege works, especially since so many (still, somehow) live in blissful ignorance of it. Here are ten highly personal examples from Lori Hutchinson. – Tyler

GOOD BLACK NEWS

by Lori Lakin Hutcherson, GBN Editor-in-Chiefby Lori Lakin Hutcherson, GBN Editor-in-Chief

Yesterday I was tagged in a post by an old high school friend, asking me and a few others a very public, direct question about white privilege and racism.  I feel compelled not only to publish his query but also my response to it, as it may be a helpful discourse for more than just a handful of folks on Facebook.

Here’s his post:

“To all of my Black or mixed race FB friends, I must profess a blissful ignorance of this “White Privilege” of which I’m apparently guilty of possessing. By not being able to fully put myself in the shoes of someone from a background/race/religion/gender/ nationality/body type that differs from my own makes me part of the problem, according to what I’m now hearing. Despite my treating everyone with respect and humor my entire life (as far as I know), I’m somehow complicit in the misfortune…

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