The Union of Socialist Geographers Newsletter, 1975-1983

I have a new post coming soon with information about the classes I’m teaching this upcoming semester. For now, this socialist geography time capsule (1975-1983) just came through the wire, and I figured I’d pass it along.

AntipodeFoundation.org

We’re pleased to announce that AntipodeFoundation.org is now the home of the archive of the Union of Socialist Geographers!

Thanks to the tireless work of Jim Thatcher (University of Washington Tacoma), Eric Sheppard (University of California Los Angeles), and Clark Akatiff (one-time Professor/life-long professor of geography), we’re able to make available the USG’s Newsletters, published from 1975 to 1982, as well as its final publication from 1983, “Society and Nature: Socialist Perspectives on the Relationship Between Human and Physical Geography”.

The archive will remain here for research, education and scholarship, freely available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs license. As you’ll see in their introduction here, Jim, Eric and Clark have reached out to a number of editors, authors and contributors, and they–and everyone here at Antipode–would like to sincerely thank all those who responded. If you have anything to add to the archive, or have any queries, please contact…

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Knoxville Area Transit to improve 13 bus routes

I’m always excited to see small-city bus services expanding, especially in the South. Based on empirical evidence (i.e. my own observations), a vast majority of those who use the bus in Knoxville are not of the 9-to-5 set. There are cultural elements behind this, too, but that doesn’t change the necessity for better public transit for those in the service, retail, and medical industries. Restaurants, department stores, and hospitals don’t adhere so strictly to the increasingly archaic 9-to-5 business schedule, and neither should public transit, especially when relatively few 9-to-5ers use it (compared to bigger cities). I would include University students in that conversation around Knoxville, considering how much they have contributed to the city’s regrowth, along with their ORNL, young-professional counterparts (who we can say for a fact don’t/can’t use the bus too often).

The Knoxville Area Transit is improving service on thirteen bus routes next week.

Source: Knoxville Area Transit to improve 13 bus routes

Call for Papers “Purple Reign: An interdisciplinary conference on the life and legacy of Prince”, Media City UK, University of Salford, Uk May 2017

I would love to participate in this, or at least be able to head over to the UK next May and be there for it. One of the organizers is actually at MTSU! If you have anything academic in your notebook or brain about Prince, then get in touch with these folks. The question is, will they cater their luncheon with starfish and coffee?

Dr Kirsty Fairclough

I’m very pleased to announce the following call for papers:

“Purple Reign: An interdisciplinary conference on the life and legacy of Prince”

A two-day international conference hosted by The School of Arts and Media, University of Salford, UK and the Department of Recording Industry, Middle Tennessee State University, USA 24th- – 26th May 2017 Media City UK, University of Salford, UK.

Convenors:

Dr Mike Alleyne, Dept of Recording Industry, College of Media & Entertainment, Middle Tennessee State University

Dr Kirsty Fairclough, School of Arts and Media, University of Salford, UK

Tim France, School of Arts and Media, University of Salford, UK

Proposals are invited for a two-day international conference on the life and legacy of Prince.

This conference aims to provide fresh perspectives on the creative and commercial dimensions of Prince’s career, re-examining the meanings of his work in the context of his unexpected death.

This conference seeks to address the issue…

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Dischord Records: A Roundtable

Bandcamp Daily

Minor Threat
Minor Threat. Photo © 1980 by Susie Josephson Horgan.

There are few labels that capture the pulsating beat of a particular music scene better than Dischord did for Washington D.C. punk in the ’80s and ’90s. To mark the occasion of the entire Dischord digital catalog coming to Bandcamp (plus vinyl from Minor Threat and Fugazi), we sat down with a few people who were there in the early days and still hold the label near and dear.

Joe Gross hails from Falls Church, Virginia. He has written for Spin, Rolling Stone, the Village Voice, the Washington CityPaper, Radio On and others and is working on a 33 ⅓ book on Fugazi’s In On The Kill Taker. He covers culture, popular and un-, for the Austin American-Statesman, and lives with his family in Austin, Texas.

Aaron Leitko is a musician and journalist based in Washington…

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EDITORIAL: What I Said When My White Friend Asked for My Black Opinion on White Privilege

One of the most important challenges that cultural geographers have taken on has been to help people realize how privilege works, especially since so many (still, somehow) live in blissful ignorance of it. Here are ten highly personal examples from Lori Hutchinson. – Tyler

GOOD BLACK NEWS

by Lori Lakin Hutcherson, GBN Editor-in-Chiefby Lori Lakin Hutcherson, GBN Editor-in-Chief

Yesterday I was tagged in a post by an old high school friend, asking me and a few others a very public, direct question about white privilege and racism.  I feel compelled not only to publish his query but also my response to it, as it may be a helpful discourse for more than just a handful of folks on Facebook.

Here’s his post:

“To all of my Black or mixed race FB friends, I must profess a blissful ignorance of this “White Privilege” of which I’m apparently guilty of possessing. By not being able to fully put myself in the shoes of someone from a background/race/religion/gender/ nationality/body type that differs from my own makes me part of the problem, according to what I’m now hearing. Despite my treating everyone with respect and humor my entire life (as far as I know), I’m somehow complicit in the misfortune…

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Open Invite to AAG GeoSlam! 2016 in San Francisco

In Chicago last year, I had the opportunity to present (‘perform’ may be a more operative term) at the inaugural AAG GeoSlam! event. GeoSlam is the brilliant brainchild of Pam Sertzen and Jessie Speer, colleagues working on their PhDs at Syracuse University (by the way, Go Cuse! I’d try to keep my alma mater allegiance suppressed at times, but this is my website. Moving on…) Pam and Jessie wanted to give geographers, many of whom have artistic pursuits either concurrent or outside of their academic pursuits, an opportunity to let those flags fly for a session at the annual AAG Meeting.

Despite the mid-day time slot, non-ideal fluorescent lighting, and lack of audio in the room last year, the inaugural event was a complete blast. I read my comical/wistful essay about Radon and Gainesville, my buddy Chris Petrucelli read some of his poetry, and several others shared short stories about the passions that guided their research. I eagerly offered my help in organizing the 2016 event in San Francisco, and as we prepare to bring GeoSlam II: The Slammening (okay, that title isn’t real, but again… my site) to AAG, here is this year’s call for participants. It’s like the sign-up sheet at an open mic, except it’s actually going to be something you’d want to share with your friends and loved ones. Make sure to Add the brand-new GeoSlam page on Facebook, too, and if you’re at AAG, come and check out the event!

Tune in tomorrow for an overdue retrospective on the SEMSEC Meeting I recently attended in Trinidad, as well as later this week for a preview of my appearances at the AAG meeting (outside of the free food-and-drink parties).

Cheers, Ty


 

Dear colleagues,

We would like to invite you to attend the second annual Geo Slam at this year’s AAG conference. In homage to San Francisco’s tradition of beat poetry, and in an effort to bridge the gap between creative and academic endeavors, the Geo Slam is a non-competitive opportunity for geographers to showcase their sensory, poetic, character-driven, and metaphoric writing. Anyone can participate and will be given 5-8 minutes to share their literary pieces.

This year, the slam is the final part of a four-part session. The first three sessions on geography and literature explore the methodological and theoretical implications of reading literary sources in geography. As a follow up to this discussion, the slam will be an opportunity for geographers to share their own literary work. The theme of this year’s slam is literature as method. Through these pieces, we want to explore the ways in which creative writing inspires new geographic ways of knowing, understanding, and interpreting the world.

Sign up to participate here: http://goo.gl/forms/upjY4ySD9d

Time:         Tuesday, March 29, 2015, 4:40 PM – 6:20 PM
Place:         Hilton Hotel, Imperial B, Ballroom Level

Co-sponsored by: Development Geographies Specialty Group, Cultural Geography Specialty Group, Graduate Student Affinity Group, and the AAG Subconference

In solidarity,
GeoSlam 2016 Organizers

#aagGeoSlam #GeoSlam2016

Doreen Massey

[I currently have a brief overview of the weekend at SEMSEC 2016 in Trinidad in the works, but I was sad to hear of Doreen Massey’s passing in the past couple of days. She was a major part of my understanding of place/space theory when I entered Geography a few years ago, and her writing continue to pop up all over the place in critical theory and the general field of geographic thought. She will be missed. – Tyler]

On the sad news of Doreen Massey’s passing, two pieces that she published in Society and Space are available free to access: Massey, D (1991) “Flexible sexism”, Environment and Pl…

Source: Doreen Massey