A Quick Signal Boost: EmoGeo 2017 at CSU-Long Beach

Well, this looks interesting, doesn’t it? The international emotional geographies conference finally comes to the US, and it’s happening at my alma mater. Of course, it’s not that big of a surprise; it’s being co-produced by my friend and former adviser Deborah Thien along with her fellow human geography star Stuart Aitken (SDSU). I’m copying and pasting the information from the EmoGeo (easily a contender with DOPE for best conference shorthand in North America) page on the CSULB website, which from what I can tell also uses WordPress based on how cleanly it copied. Hope you find this interesting and feel free to pass it along! – Tyler

CONFERENCE INFORMATION

The 6th International Emotional Geographies conference will be held in the USA for the first time.

Co-hosted by Dr. Deborah Thien, CSULB, and Dr. Stuart Aitken, SDSU, with support from Emotion, Space and Society. We look forward to a wealth of interdisciplinary presentations, presenters and attendees, in Long Beach, California, June 14-16, 2017.

We encourage sessions, papers, panels and posters that investigate the emotional intersections between people and places including examinations of feelings and affect in various spatial and social contexts, environments and landscapes. Questions of emotion are relevant to several different disciplines – we seek considerations of the multiplicity of spaces and places that produce and are produced by emotional and affective life, representing an inclusive range of theoretical and methodological engagements with emotion as a social, cultural and spatial phenomenon.


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Dr. Liz Bondi

LIZ BONDI

University of Edinburgh, UK

Dr. Lynda Johnston

LYNDA JOHNSTON

University of Waikato, NZ


JOIN US!

Conference registration fees and deadlines:

Registration & Abstracts

  • Earlybird : $150, register between February 11th, 2017 and April 13th, 2017
  • Regular: $175, register between April 14th, 2017 and May 11th, 2017
  • Late: $200, register on or after May 12th, 2017
  • Day Rate: $70
  • Student Conference Rates: $50 (Earlybird), $60 (Regular), $70 (Late)
  • Abstracts will be accepted during Earlybird and Regular registration periods

Join our contact list to be updated with news about the conference.

Interested in childcare options? Please write to emogeo@csulb.edu.

The Casual Geographer Presents: “Intersection Songs”

For those of you who were not connected to me during my time at CSU-Long Beach, my friends Bret Hartt, Abel Santana, and I co-founded a podcast and weekly radio show called “The Casual Geographer.” We produced over thirty episodes, most of which were posted at our original blogspot site here (the audio links no longer work, but the descriptions and graphics are still there, and if I may say so, delightful). Each episode tackled a different subject and explained how geography enveloped said subject. It lasted most of the two years I spent in Long Beach, and we had a lot of fun.

This week, in a seminar on tourism geography, my colleagues and I discussed a wonderful article by Duncan Light on the commodification and consumption of place names. I found it interesting, as a musically-inclined geographer, how he used examples such as AC/DC (seriously, why is there no lightning bolt key?) Street in Melbourne as ways in which cities and regions place and focus what John Urry legendarily called “the tourist gaze.” In particular, Light (2014, 145*) wrote:

…It is the marker – the signage – that is important in affirming and validating the visit. As such the place-name signage (the most commonplace and banal of objects) becomes the principal focus of tourist interest and the setting for a range of activities and performances.

Unsurprisingly, my mind immediately leaped to the corner of Fountain and Fairfax, where I drove by upon moving to the Los Angeles area, motivated by The Afghan Whigs’ dramatic 1993 song of that title**.  My mind then immediately jumped to Episode 3 of The Casual Geographer, where we discussed whatever background information we could find on a handful of songs named after street intersections. These included “53rd and 3rd” (NYC) by the Ramones, “Fountain and Fairfax” (Los Angeles) by the Afghan Whigs, “Queen and John” (Toronto) by Good Riddance, “9th and Hennepin” (Minneapolis) by Tom Waits, and “13th and Euclid” (DC) by the Dismemberment Plan. Thanks to Russ Rankin for his gracious email reply telling us the story of “Queen and John” (which I read during the episode), as well as Travis Morrison for his brief explanation of what happened at a gas station near 13th and Euclid (as well as giving me the go-ahead to use “The Face of the Earth” as a theme song for the show).

I’ll gradually work on wrenching more of these recordings from my archives. For now, have a listen to this episode and I hope you enjoy it. This was an early episode, and the production quality improved from here, I promise.

LINER NOTES

* Light, D. (2014). Tourism and toponymy: commodifying and consuming place names. Tourism Geographies, 16(1), 141-156.

** If you’re at all familiar with the Afghan Whigs or the greater spate of work by Greg Dulli, using the word “dramatic” to describe any of their songs could seem pretty redundant, I realize.

Storage Wars: CSULB Edition

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The one folded back into a book. Early settlement patterns of colonists in the United States, pre-1700.

My friend David and I decided to rummage through our department’s storage pit, unearthing a ridiculous bounty of USGS Maps from the post-War era that covered everything from climate to topography, as well as innumerable other classroom treasures from over forty years ago. It’s crazy just how much physical material passed through a typical Geography department before the digital revolution; I can understand why nobody was particularly sad to transition to zeros and ones. Still, we barely found anything that wouldn’t look awesome on someone’s wall. We’re currently thinking about doing a CSULB antique map show somewhere in Long Beach this spring.

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We found a beautiful hand-drawn map of Hungary on the back of a classroom map of Europe. If you had any hand in this, contact me so we can give credit.

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