Help Map a Historically Black Cemetery in East Knoxville

oddfellows_14139

Attention people interested in GIS and small-scale mapping!

My good friend Maegan Dennison from the UT-Knoxville Anthropology Department is heading up a new service project that will spearhead field mapping, GIS, and web mapping for the Odd Fellows Cemetery in East Knoxville. The field work would take place in the Spring before the vegetation starts growing back so likely January – March 2017. I’ll be passing this announcement on to my students in GEOG 320, but I wanted to get the word out here in case anybody may be interested in learning more about, and contributing to, this historically black cemetery.

If you’re interested and/or looking for more information, you can email Maegan at mdenniso [at] vols [dot] utk [dot] edu.

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Locals and Tourists (Geotagging)

Locals and Tourists #15 (GTWA #47): Santa Monica and western Los Angeles//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

While I am not as much of a cartography expert as I’d like to be, I wanted to share this project by the talented Eric Fischer. It landed on my news feed from Bill Bowen, the longtime chair of the Cal State Northridge Geography program and major benefactor of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographer (who you should hopefully have the chance to meet one day and chat with about the last six decades of Geographic education; he was there in Berkeley in the 1950s).

Anyway, Fischer’s project involves a heavy use of geotagging to cache where people discernible as “tourists” take photos in cities versus where those discernible as “locals” do. The results are not without the logistical issues (also, they are based on data from the beginning of this decade), but the visual output is stunning. It should also be highly intriguing and useful as a way to teach urban geography.

Locals and Tourists #4 (GTWA #3): Paris

Take, for example, the map of Paris above. Many of the red blotches are fairly easy to guess (The Eiffel Tower, Avenue des Champs-Élysées, and Notre Dame), but others make for a fun challenge (Père Lachaise Cemetery, Versailles, and ???).

Here, kids, is a tourist.

Here, kids, is a tourist.

I hope you’re all having pleasant Sundays and hope you enjoyed this.

A Call for Papers, and Happy Thanksgiving

I apologize for the late notice on this, but in case you have not received this CFP from Johnny Finn yet, I’ve decided to post it here, and encourage you to send him an abstract by this weekend. Finn has established himself over the past decade as one of the top music geographers, and I’m sure there will be much more from/about him on my site in the future. At any rate, I’m looking forward to working with him at the AAG Conference in Tampa this coming April, where I’ll be presenting some of my research on music and urban landscapes of public memory.

CALL FOR PAPERS
Geographies of Sound & Music

Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting
2014 AAG Annual Meeting, Tampa, April 8-12, 2014

Sponsored by:
Communication Geography Specialty Group
Aether: The Journal of Media Geography

In recent years sound, rhythm, and music have commanded increasing attention from geographers. Geographical engagements with the aural have come in a variety of forms: from quantitative studies of music scenes to theoretical considerations of sound and music in non-representational theory; from research focusing on the role of music in constructing and maintaining regional identity to new methodological approaches and techniques for the sound world.

This session aims to gather researchers from a wide range of theoretical, practical, and topical areas to push the boundaries of geographical research that engages the spatialities of sound, rhythm, and music. Potential topics of interest include (but are in no way limited to):

  • Music and national/regional/local identity
  • Sound/music in creating filmic space
  • The political economic of the music industry
  • Sound and urban space
  • Aural methodologies
  • Mapping sound and music
  • GIS & music
  • Music & geographical pedagogy
  • Music & non-representational theory

If interested in participating in this session, please email Presenter Identification Number (PIN) and abstract to Johnny Finn (john.finn@cnu.edu) by Dec 1, 2013.

There you are. Good luck. And everyone, have a wonderful Thanksgiving, wherever you are.

In this case, I’m thankful for artchive.com.