GeoSym2016: A Look Back

I’m excited to report here that my first foray into academic conference production was a success! The 2nd biennial University of Tennessee Geography Research Symposium (or GeoSym2016, thanks to colleague Alisa Hass for the truncated and easily hashtaggable nickname took place earlier this month on February 5th and 6th at the University of Tennessee. We are currently working on putting updates and links to all of these on our official departmental page, but I figured I would use my personal site to dig into the event a bit more.

In many ways, this event built on our debut Symposium in 2014. The committee, headed by me and my good friend/colleague Savannah Collins, chose to hold the Symposium a bit earlier in 2016 than they did in 2014, for a couple of reasons. We wanted to make sure that it happened early enough in the semester to avoid any of the stresses that build up toward spring break. We also wanted to make sure to give our participants a good breather in between this and AAG (which will be held earlier than usual this year, the final week in March, in San Francisco), all while providing a window during which to edit and improve their paper talks where needed beforehand.

One of GeoSym’s greatest strengths, as a small conference, is to provide a platform for more embryonic and ambitious research, where researchers can share their ideas in a lower-pressure environment, not subject to perceived pillorying from a room full (depending upon your time slot) of high-pressure academics at one of the biggest conferences in the world. While we were walking to dinner on Friday evening, our keynote guest Dydia DeLyser told me how remarkable and refreshing it was to see so much early-stage research coming from so many early-career researchers, who often wait until completely sewing their projects up before daring to bring it to a paper session. I told her how happy that made me to hear.

Speaking of Dr. DeLyser, she was everything I had spent the past year or two hyping her up to be. From the moment she landed in Knoxville, she was engaging, excited for all of our work, and of course encouraging. Her keynote talk was every bit as groundbreaking (materialities are already beginning to gain steam as a concept in cultural geography) as we had hoped, and the well-attended keynote audience on Saturday afternoon certainly thought so. We made a video of Dydia’s talk, as well as the closing ceremony (of sorts; we were pretty informal about it), now up on the UTK Geography Youtube page for anyone who either missed it or just wants to relive the moment, shaky audio and all.

We were also fortunate to have Matt Cook (our committee’s webmaster) and Dr. Liem Tran, both photography enthusiasts the point of having quality cameras, on hand to capture the proceedings. Their full collaborative photoset is here, but I’ve pulled a few of the highlights to paste below here.

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Conferences this Spring: GeoSym2016 (2/5-6), SEMSEC (3/4-6), and AAG (3/27-4/2)

An update to let you all know where and when you can find me and my research this Spring Semester.

GeoSym_flyer11x17.jpgGEOSYM 2016
The University of Tennessee
Knoxville, TN
February 5 – 6, 2016

This is not only a chance to see me present some of my research on France, but also visit my first conference as an event coordinator. My good friend and colleague Savannah Collins and I are currently in the home stretch of pulling the final schedule together for the papers, panels, and workshops. It’s been a challenging and already rewarding process, and we’re excited to welcome over 50 scholars, including our keynote Dr. Dydia DeLyser, to the symposium. I had wanted Dr. DeLyser to feature at this event ever since I became the chair of the 2016 event over two years ago now. Her talks on the geographic history of neon light restoration at AAG 2013 and 2014 were as entertaining as they were fascinating. For this conference, she will be presenting on the Geographies of Materiality, focusing on the restoration of three Indian Motocycles [sic]. Our schedule and other details are posted at our Facebook event here, and will shortly be added to the official page on our department’s site here.


 

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SEMSEC
Society for Ethnomusicology, Southeast and Caribbean Annual Meeting
Southern Academy of the Performing Arts
San Fernando, Trinidad
March 4-6, 2016

This sounds horrible, I know. Not that I post a whole lot anyway, but I’ll try to minimize the amount of beach photos on social media so you don’t all get jealous and start plotting my demise. No matter where the conference is held, I’m glad to be able to make my return to SEMSEC with my French DC/punk research in between eating my weight in doubles and sneaking in some scuba diving. Also, if anyone knows where to find the good dusty Calypso records, I’m all about that, too.


 

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AAG
Association of American Geographers Annual Meeting
San Francisco, CA
March 27 – April 2, 2016

I’m excited to see a lot of the usual suspects this time around, even some of the less-than-usual suspects, making the trek across the globe to one of the our coolest and most expensive cities. I’ll be presenting my paper at 6pm on Wednesday, April 30th. I’ll also be performing in the Second Annual GeoSlam! Event. More info on all this as it draws closer.

I’ve got some planning and budgeting to do.

[UPDATE: Deadline Extended!] Submit for the 2016 Tennessee Geography Symposium at UT (Deadline 1/1)

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** UPDATE: DEADLINE EXTENDED TO 1/15 FOR ALL SUBMISSIONS**

Dear colleagues near and far (as well as those I haven’t had the pleasure of meeting yet),

This is just a call and reminder that the deadline for (free!) submissions to present at the second biennial University of Tennessee Interdisciplinary Geography Research Symposium (or GeoSym) is approaching! Please take a few minutes by Friday, January 1st, and visit our page and form to submit your abstract for your paper, your panel, or your poster (Undergrads have until 1/15 to submit for our poster session).

This February 5&6, we’ll be welcoming keynote speaker Dr. Dydia DeLyser of Cal State-Fullerton to our event. Her presentations have been a highlight of every event I’ve seen her speak at, and her research in the field of cultural geography continues to be groundbreaking. In short, she is not to be missed. Here is some more background on Dr. DeLyser:

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Also, if you haven’t yet, please RSVP to our Facebook event and invite anybody on campus or in the region who may be interested. The more interdisciplinary we get, the better the program.
I’ve kept relatively mum about it on this site thus far, but I’m honored to be one of the chairs of the coordinating committee for GeoSym this year. Anyone who was at the event in 2014 knows and I can’t emphasize enough, this is our event as an organization of Geography graduate students and in representing our discipline on the UT Campus and in the Southeastern Region. It also provides an excellent opportunity to run your research in preparation for AAG or any other conference you may have coming up this Spring. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact me or co-chair Savannah Collins (scolli15@vols.utk.edu).
On behalf of the GeoSym coordinating committee, I hope you’re all having a great Holiday season and have a happy and healthy New Year!
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Dr. William Moseley (Macalester College) delivers his keynote speech at the inaugural UT Geography Symposium in 2014. (Matt Cook Photo)